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PART II, CHAPTER 11.
BURIAL PLACES AND EPITAPHS.

"I would rather," remarks Edmund Burke, "sleep in the southern corner of a little country churchyard than in the tomb of the Capulets"; and doubtless the same sentiment is felt, if not expressed, by many whose departed friends repose in rural graveyards.

The method of conducting funerals in olden times was substantially the same as at present, so far as relates to the performance or non-performance of religious rites. The mode of carrying the remains of the dead, however, from the house to their last resting-place, was slightly different.

Previous to the introduction of the first hearse, in 1818 in Brunswick, and still later in Topsham and Harpswell, bodies were carried to the grave on stretchers and the coffin covered with a pall. In Brunswick, the pall was kept, at one time, by Mrs. Benjamin Stone. Usually eight men accompanied the corpse, four carrying it until tired and then being relieved by the other four. The stretchers, or biers, were made of poles, young trees with the bark on, and were discarded after being once used. They were not made for permanent use, but were hastily made for each occasion.

Many of the burying-grounds in this vicinity are of old date. The earliest one in Brunswick of which there is any record or tradition was situated about midway between Bow and Mill Streets, fronting on Maine Street. It was just south of and adjoining the stone fort built by Governor Andross in 1689. This graveyard was used for the burial of the dead until about the time of the incorporation of the town. In this yard was the stone marking the burial-place of Benjamin Larrabee, agent of the Pejepscot proprietors, one of the commanders of Fort George, and the ancestor of the Larrabees now living in this vicinity. Here also were the gravestones of Robert and Andrew Dunning, who were killed by the Indians at Mason's rock. The site of this yard is now covered with buildings.

Another graveyard, probably of still earlier date, though nothing whatever is known in regard to it, was situated on what is now a portion of Woodlawn Street, on the estate of Miss Narcissa Stone.

On the thirty-first of May, 1856, two skeletons were exhumed by the workmen engaged in grading the street. It is not unreasonable to suppose that these were the remains of some of Purchase's fishermen, and if so, they were undoubtedly the first white people buried in this village, though perhaps not the first in the town.

The old graveyard of the First Parish, Brunswick, situated one mile south of the colleges, has been occupied as such since 1735. In this burying-ground are many stones the inscriptions upon which are illegible, and in some instances the stones themselves have crumbled to pieces, so that only a small portion of each one remains. Of those which can be deciphered the following are of interest on account of their age, the quaintness of the inscriptions, or the character of those they commemorate:-

HERE LYETH THE BO
DY OF MR. ANDREW
DUNING
WHO DEPARTED THIS
LIFE JANUARY THE
18TH ANNUDUM
1 7 3 6
AGED 72 YRS.

1660 Charles 2d  
1685 James 2d  
  16641666 London
Burnt
1689 Wm & Mary  
1702 Queen Ann   
1714 George 1st  
1727 George 2d   


HERE LYES BURIED THE BODY OF
SAMUEL MOODY, ESQ.
one of his Majesty's Justs of ye
Peace for the County of York
& Commander of his Majestys Fort
George at Brunswick who D'ceas'd
Sept. 22-1758.


Sacred
TO THE MEMORY OF
REV. ROBERT DUNLAP
First settled minister of Brunswick,
Born in Ireland, Aug. 1715
Educated in Edinburgh;
Came to America, June 1736:
Settled at Brunswick, 1747;
Died June 26, 1775,
Ęt. 60.
"Behold a Sower went forth to sow."

The two following epitaphs are from stones in the old Baptist Burying-Ground, at Maquoit. This graveyard was first used as such about 1794.

The first epitaph reads thus:-

" To be much lov'd in life much mourn'd in death,
A widow'd husband of a wife bereft,
With tears inscribes this monumental stone,
Which holds her ashes and expects his own."

The second is evidently that of a man accustomed to serious and deep thought. It runs thus:-

" This languishing head is at rest,
Its thinking and aching are o'er."

The old burying-ground at New Meadows was first used as such some time in the latter part of the last century. It contains the head-stones of many former residents of that part of the town, but there are none that require particular notice here.

The burying-ground at "Growstown" in Brunswick was first used about 1813. The following inscriptions are found in it:-

In Memory of
ELD GEORGE LAMB
who departed this life
Dec 14 - 1836
Ęt 48

Mr. Lamb was converted to God at the age of 15 and engaged in the ministry at the age of 23. He laboured faithfully in his Masters service 25 years and died in full assurance of a blessed immortality beyond the grave.

Remember how he spake unto you when he was yet with you.

The following epitaph, which appears to us entitled to an insertion here, is to be found in this graveyard:-

Dear husband while you spill your tears
In numbering o'er past happy years,
But yet remember while you weep,
With me you in the grave must sleep;
But the last trumpet we shall hear,
Before our God we must appear,
And then with Jesus we shall reign
And never part nor weep again."

Pine Grove Cemetery, in the village of Brunswick, a short distance east of the colleges, was laid out in the year 1825. The land

originally was a part of the college grounds, but in 1821 it was deeded, by vote of the trustees, to Robert Eastman, Nahum Houghton, Abner Bourne, "and their associates, heirs, executors, administrators, or assigns," so long as it should be used for the interment of the dead, and if not so used, to revert to the college. The amount of land thus deeded was two acres, which was bounded as follows. "Beginning at the southwesterly side of the old County Road leading to Bath, at a stake and stone at or near the angle which it makes with the Bath turnpike, and running by said turnpike west 20°, north 12 rods, thence south 20°, west 263 rods, thence east 20°, south 12 rods, and thence north 20°, east 263 rods to the first boundary." The trustees also reserved the exclusive right at all times to hold as a place of interment for the dead "that part of the premises extending from said turnpike road on the westerly line of said lot, eighteen rods in length, and one and a half rods in breadth," subject only to such general regulations as should be binding upon other owners of lots.1

This cemetery is pleasantly situated, with handsome grounds and walks, which are kept in good order; it is enclosed with a neat and ornamental fence, and contains many handsome monuments and memorial tablets. Major Lemuel Swift was the first person buried here. Among the monuments and headstones to be seen there are those of Presidents McKeen and Appleton; Professors Cleaveland, Upham, and Smyth; and Governor Dunlap.

The tomb of President McKeen is in the extreme northwestern angle of the cemetery, the head toward Bath Street. In form, this tomb is an oblong rectangle, covering the grave, and about three feet in height. The pedestal is of Egyptian marble, and is surmounted by a heavy slab of white marble, which bears the following inscription:-

H. S. E.
QUOD MORTALE FUIT
VIRI ADMODUM REVERENDI,
DNI JOSEPHI McKEEN, S. T. D.
AC COLLEGII BOWDOINENSIS PRESIDES PRIMI.
Natus est Octobe die XVo Anno Dom. MDCCLVII,
in Republicā Neo-Hautoniensi,
ubi primņ in literis humanioribus institutus,
honores attigit Academicos.


1. From original deed.


Postea VERBI DIVINI ministerio apud Beverleam,
in Republicā Massachusettensi,
annos septendecim
strenuč juxta, ac benignè perfunctus est.
Novissimč autem, Nostratium omnium favore,
ac præcipuè doetorum piorumque,
Collegium hic loci auspicato fundatum,
quinque vix annos,
eā, quā par est, dignitate et sapentiā
fldeliter, feliciter rexit;
donee, morbo Hydropico impeditus,
Julii die XVo Ann. MDCCCVII, in Domino abdormivit.
Ingenio fuit sagaci, judicio imprimis acerrimo,
priscorum temporum gravitate æmulus,
moribus autem facilis,
et benevolentia omnino Christianus.
Pietatem, doctrinam, artes optimas,
quoniam guaviter excolebat ipse,
in allis semper amavit, et quoad potuit, auxit.
M. S.
Monumentum hocce,
luctus, eheu! solamen leve,
at testimonium tamen,
SENATVS ACADEMICVS,
P. C.1

In the adjoining lot south is the monument of President Appleton. Its form is the same as that of President McKeen. The following is the inscription:-


1. Here is buried what was mortal of the reverend and most learned man, Joseph McKeen, S. T. D., the (first president of Bowdoin College. He was born October 15, A D. 1742, in the State of New Hampshire, where, first of all, instructed in secular learning, he attained academic honors. Afterwards he discharged, actively as well as kindly, the duty of a minister of the Gospel, at Beverly, in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, for seventeen years. But lately, a college having been auspiciously founded here in this town, not quite five years, with the approbation of all our countrymen, and especially of the educated and pious, he presided over it, as is meet, with dignity and wisdom, faithfully and fortunately, until, embarrassed by a dropsical disease, on the fifteenth day of July. in the year 1807, he fell asleep in the Lord. He was a Christian of sagacious mind, of especially acute discernment, in dignity emulous of former times, but courteous in manner and uniformly kind. He always loved in others, as he himself diligently cultivated, piety, education, the best occupations, and, so far as he could, he promoted them. Sacred to the memory, This monument of grief, alas! slight consolation, but yet a testimony, the Academic Council have caused to be placed.


Huic tumulo mandantur reliquæ
REV. JESSE APPLETON, S. T. D.
MARITI DESIDERATISSIMI. PATRIS OPTIMI.
ALMEQUE NOSTRĘ ACADEMMIĘ
SECUNDI PRESIDIS.
Vir fuit ingenii acumine insiguis, moribus
compositis, ac aspectu benigno,
majestatem quondam præ
se ferente;
sed morti inexorabili nihil est sanctum.
Eruditione magna,
inter literatorum principes justissime collocandus;
at theologicę scientię lauream praecipue meritus
hac enim, quo homines audeant,
cognovit et tentavit.
Integra fide, discipliuaque salutari,
duodecim annos,
res Academicas administravit.
Nimiis tandem vigiliis laboribusque consumptus,
sublimii ejus animo supernis intento,
ad quietem se contulit.
Ita vixit, ut omnes moribundi, sic se vixisse,
velint; ita mortuus est,
ut omnes, sic se morituros esse, optarent
tamen voluit inscribi, se salutem sperasse in Jesu.
Natus est Novemiis die 17mo
Anno Domini MDCCLXXII.
Obiit Novemiis die 12mo Anno
Domini MDCCCXIX.1

On the south end of the tomb is inscribed:-

Senatus Academia) Bowdoinensis,
summa reverentia,
hoc monumentum posuerunt.2


1. To this tomb are committed the remains of Reverend Jesse Appleton, S. T. D. The most regretted husband, the best father, and the revered second president of our college. He was a man distinguished by acuteness of mind, composed manners, and benign aspect, occasionally manifesting dignity: but nothing is sacred to inexorable death. Of great erudition, most justly placed amongst the first of teachers, but especially deserving the laurel in theological knowledge: for this, where men may presume, he examined and tested. He administered the affairs of the college with, incorruptible fidelity and with salutary discipline for twelve years. At length, worn out by excessive vigils and labors, his exalted mind fixed upon celestial things, he betook himself to rest. He so lived as all who are at the point of death may wish themselves to have lived: thus he died, as all themselves about to die might desire. Yet he wished it to be inscribed that he hoped for salvation in Jesus. He was born November 17, 1772. He died November 12, 1819.
2. The trustees and overseers of Bowdoin College, with the greatest reverence, have erected this monument.


In the third lot south of President Appleton's is the monument of Professor Smyth. It is a heavy, rectangular pillar of granite, about ten feet in height. The pedestal bears the family name, while on the northern side of the shaft is the following inscription:-

WILLIAM SMYTH
born Feb. 2d 1797, died April 4th 1868.

Below this is the name of his wife, with the date of her birth and death, and on the eastern side is a record of the names and dates of birth and death of several children.

The second lot south of Professor Smyth's contains the monument of Professor Cleaveland, a plain yet elegant granite sarcophagus. On the eastern side it bears the words "Parker Cleaveland"; on the south end is the date of his birth, 1780, while on the north is that of his death, 1852. Two headstones of white marble, one upon the east and one upon the west, mark the resting-places of wife and daughter.

The monument of Professor Upham stands in the next lot south-ward of Professor Cleaveland's. This also, like the two last, is of plain granite, and is in form an obelisk. The pedestal is proportionately large, and bears on the western side the initials T. C. U.; while on the south side is the date of birth, 1799, and on the north are the figures 1872, the date of his death. The plinth bears the family name in distinct raised letters.

The Dunlap monument is situated near the principal entrance to the cemetery. It consists of a base, sub-base, plinth, die, -with three marble tablets inserted,-cap, and bust of Dunlap. It is, without the bust, ten feet, four inches high, and of granite, though the bust is of marble. It was made by Simmons. Upon the north tablet is the following inscription:-

To the Memory
of
ROBERT PINCKNEY DUNLAP,
who was three times
GRAND MASTER
of the GRAND LODGE OF MAINE,
and
filled the highest places in the
Masonic Fraternity
of the State and the
UNITED STATES,

This monument is erected by the
FREE MASONS
of the
STATE OF MAINE.
They knew his virtues;
They honor his memory.

On the west side:-

ROBERT P. DUNLAP
was
GOVERNOR OF MAINE
from 1834 to 1838.
He had been
Representative, Senator, and
twice President of the Senate,
in the State Legislature;
and Executive Councillor; and was
afterwards representative in
Congress and Collector of the
Port of Portland.
He honored
every position he was called to fill
by an
able and faithful discharge
of its duties.
THE STATE
gives to his memory the tribute
of its respect by inscribing
upon this tablet its grateful
recollection of his many virtues
and its high appreciation of
his public services.

On the east side is the following:-

DEAREST
TO THE NEAREST
BEST
TO THEM WHO KNEW HIM BEST.
In Christ here
With Christ forever.
Died
Oct. 20, 1859.
Ęt. 65.
Inscribed
by wife and children
in loving and reverent
remembrance.

One of the oldest graveyards in town is that at New Meadows in the woods near Bartlett Adams's, where rest the remains of several

members of the Thompson family. There are other burying grounds in Brunswick, some of which are of recent dates and require no particular mention in these pages.

The oldest burying-ground in Topsham of which there are now any traces was in the vicinity of James Mustard's residence, about two miles from the village on the road to Merrymeeting Bay. There are but three or four stones remaining. They are of slate, and are in a good state of preservation. They are in the woods about a third of a mile from the road. The earliest date given upon these stones is 1752. and the latest 1771.

The burying-ground near the old First Parish Meeting-House is the oldest in this town of which there is any record.

In 1769 the town purchased of James Hunter "the the land on the south side of the county road where the graveyard is," paying therefor three pounds; and the same year the town appropriated £5 6s. 8d. "for fencing the graveyard, nine rods square, with white oak or cedar posts and good boards, with a good gate, with a lock and key, the fence to be five feet high." There are a few stones, the inscriptions upon which are illegible, whether from greater age or poorer slate can-not be determined. The earliest date to be found upon any stone is 1769. The following are a few of the more interesting inscriptions to be found in this burying ground:-

HIC JACENT SEPULTA
the Remains of
PHILIP G. HOYT PHYSICIAN
who died June 24th 1790
ĘTATIS 36.
I'm to this silent Grave retired,
Though once esteemed and desired;
All human ills had once a place,
And weighed justly in this breast,
All mortal griefs are now past o'er,
A broken heart can bleed no more.

PHILIP G. HOYT's EPITAPH ON HIMSELF NOV ye 23d 1789.


Sacred to the memory of
JOHN REED ESQUIRE,
A Capt in the late American War where he served with reputation till
obliged to retire in consequence of a wound received in an action
a little preceding the capture of Genl Burgoine and
army. He so far recovered his health and
activity that he was elected to and
sustained the office of Lt.
Col. till his death.

He was an affectionate Husband and Parent and his hos--
pitality endeared him to many who mourned his
departure which was suddenly, in a
paroxism of the cholic on the
20th day of Oct. A. D. 1797.
Aged 50 Years


LIEUT JAMES PURINTON
Dec 7th 1832
Aged 90 years.
One of the revolutionary officers and Staunch supporters of the
Republican Constitution.

Several stones bear the following inscription:-

Behold and see as you pass by,
As you are now so once was I,
As I am now so you must be,
Prepare for death and follow me.

The third burying-ground in Topsham, in point of age, is the one about a mile west of the village, where the first Baptist or "old yellow" meeting-house used to stand. In this ground are the remains of John Merrill, Esquire, Captain Peletiah Haley, and others of the early settlers who lived in that portion of the town.

There was formerly a private burying-ground on what was known as "Ferry Point" (the point of land at the Topsham end of the iron railroad bridge). Here were buried the remains of Brigadier-General Thompson and others of the family. When the railroad was laid out, the remains were removed to the village graveyard, those of Brigadier Thompson being placed in the grave with his son, Humphrey Thompson.

The village burying-ground in Topsham was laid out in 1825. It is owned by the proprietors of the lots. The unoccupied land is owned by Mrs. Susan T. Purinton. Among the inscriptions of particular interest in this ground are the following:-

ERECTED
by the Baptist
Church in Topsham
In Memory of
REV. CHARLES JOHNSON
their Pastor, who died
Feb. 29, 1836
in the 30th year
of his age.

Behold a Christian's grave - He walked with God
In the same path the dear Redeemer trod;
He loved the Church and prayed for its increase
Lived much belov'd & died in perfect peace.

Sacred
to
THE MEMORY OF
REV. OLIVER H. QUIMBY
who, having zealously proclaimed a full and free Salvation
for all mankind through Christ, for nearly two
years, fell gently asleep in the arms of
Jesus, at his residence in Lisbon,
Jany. 23d 1842
Aged 23 years.

"Glory to God" he cried,
Then bowed his head and died,
His soul was borne on angels wings
To blissful rest, where seraphs sing.

There are four graveyards in Harpswell, one upon the Neck, one on Great Island, one upon Orr's, and one upon Bailey's Island, the oldest of which is the one adjoining the old First Parish Meeting--House. The oldest stone in this yard is undecipherable. It was probably placed there about 1758. There are several interesting gravestones in this yard, which the space at our disposal prevents us from giving. We insert here, however, the inscriptions upon the tombstones of the first pastor of that church, and of his wife, and also of William McNess, of the second pastor of the church, and of Deacon Andrew and Benjamin Dunning. The inscription upon Elisha Eaton's stone is as follows:-

HERE LYES INTERRED THE BODY OF THE
REVD MR. ELISHA EATON,
first Pastor of the Church in Harpswell who
triumphantly Departed this Life on
the 22d of April, A. D. 1764.
In the 62d Year of his Age.
Est Commune mori,
Mors nulli Paretic Honori,
Neque ulli Ętati
Ergo. MEMENTO M0RI.1


1. To die is common, death spares no nobility nor any age. Therefore remember death.


The inscription on his wife's tombstone is:-

To the Memory of
MRS KATHERINE EATON,
The Virtuous RELICT OF THE REV. Mr ELISHA EATON,
WHO DEPARTED
THIS LIFE APRIL 12, 1767, Ę. 61.

Here, Passenger, confin'd reduc'd to Dust,
Lies what was once religious, wise & just,
Fixt, in deep Slumbers here the Dust is giv'n.
Til the last Trumpet shakes the Frame of Heav'n,
Then fresh to Life the Waking Saint shall rise,
And in new Triumphs glitter up the skies,
Like her be virtuous, you like her shall shine,
In Bliss above, immortal & divine.

The inscriptions upon the other stones are as follows:--

HERE LIES BURIED
the Body of
Mr WILLIAM MACKNES,
who DeParted
this Life May
ye 12th 1782
Age 103 years Old.


THE REV. SAMUEL EATON,
2d MINISTER OF HARPSWELL,
born April 3 1737
graduated at Harvard College 1763
Ordained Oct 24, 1764,
& died Nov. 5, 1822.
in the 86 year of his age
& 59th of his Ministry.
Blessed are the dead who die in the Lord.


Sacred to the memory of
DEAC. ANDREW DUNNING,
who was chosen Deac. of the Church in this town, June 17, 1767;
which office he filled till his decease, March 27, 1808. Ę. 81.
His life was useful his death peaceful.

Sleep sweetly in the grave of rest,
Which Christ perfumed and also blest
Till he shall call thee to the skies,
Shall bid thy sacred dust arise!
     Survivors walk Christ's path as straight
     And enter in the heavenly gate.

To the memory of
BENJ'A DUNNING ESQ.
who with the utmost composure breathed his last Jan. 8, 1808
Ęt 71. As a Husband, Parent, Christian, and civil Mag-
istrate he was conspicuous. The Town, which for
many years he represented. The Board
of Overseers of Bowdoin College,
and in fine, civil society, are
deprived of a useful,
wise and peaceful
member.

But tho' his loss fills us with grief and pain
Our loss is his inestimable gain - For
Thro' the ethereal blue, his soul immortal,
Borne on angelic wings, at the third Heaven
Arriv'd the spirits of just men made perfect,
Joined in lofty hallelujahs to the sacred
Time, eternity throughout.

In this connection it is proper to mention the discovery, in 1861, of an undoubted Indian burying-ground in Harpswell. It is on the farm of Henry Barnes, on the eastern side of Middle Bay, near the shore. Fourteen skeletons have been disinterred. Though of course there are no headstones, it is known to have been an Indian burying-place by the appearance of the skeletons, the ornaments found on or near them, its vicinity to the "carrying-place," a tradition to that effect, and lastly by the testimony of a party of seven Penobscot Indians who once stopped there on their way to Portland, and who pointed out the spot as an Indian burying-place and stated that there was once an Indian village near by.


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