FIFTH ANNUAL AWARDS DINNER MEETING
THURSDAY, JUNE 12, 2008 6 P.M.
at
THE BOUNTY RESTAURANT
HOLIDAY INN, BATH

Our raffle that night for the framed and matted print by Mort Kunstler, "Winter Riders - Raleigh, North Carolina, February 5, 1863" was won by Deb Tranten (mother of Brooke Tranten).

 a photograph of part of the crowd at our Annual Banquet.

The crowd at our fifth annual dinner.

 

 

 

A photograph of Anne Metcalf receiving the History Award from Vice President Jay Stencil

Anne Metcalf receiving the History Award from Vice President Jay Stencil.

 

 

 

A photogaph of Diane Smith receiving the Warran B. Randall Award from President Sue Bailey.

Diane Smith receiving the Warren B. Randall Award from President Sue Bailey.

 

 

 

A photogaph of incoming President Jay Stencil presenting a bouquet of flowers to outgoing President Sue Bailey.

Incoming President Jay Stencil presenting a bouquet of flowers to outgoing President Sue Bailey.

 

 

 

We were pleased that Dr. Piston was our featured speaker at the Annual Awards Dinner on Thursday, June 12, 2008 at the Holiday Inn in Bath.

IN THE DEVILíS DOMINION: MISSOURI IN THE
CIVIL WAR

At the start of the Civil War, Missouri had few slaves, even after being admitted as a "slave state" in 1820. Missouri in the 1850ís was infested by bands of guerillas, which not only burned farms of pro- and anti-secessionist residents, but also raided across state lines into Kansas to force the slavery issue in the neighboring territory.

During the Civil War, Missouri was torn apart by both civil strife and pitched battles. Twelve entire towns in Missouri were burned by guerillas, forcing one-quarter of the population of Missouri to flee the state. Missouri ranks third after Virginia and Tennessee as the most fought over state, and it was arguably one of the worst places to live in the years from 1861-1865. A Federal soldier referred to Missouri as "the devilís dominion."

Professor William G. Pistonís presentation did focus on the military, political, social, and geographic factors that shaped the war in Missouri, and made it so unique.

William Piston, a native of Tennessee, can trace his familyís roots to Rockland, Maine. He received his B.A. and M.A. from Vanderbilt University, and his Ph.D from the University of South Carolina. He is the author of "Leeís Tarnished Lieutenant," a revisionist biography of James Longstreet, and "Wilsonís Creek: The Second Battle of the Civil War and the Men Who Fought It". He has been a Professor in the Department of History at Missouri State University in Springfield since 1988.

We are pleased that Dr. Piston was our featured speaker at the Annual Awards Dinner on Thursday, June 12th, at the Holiday Inn in Bath.

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